Renting a Place for a Few Days

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Here comes the sun! After a long wait, Quebec has finally reopened to interregional tourism. This could be a great time to do that long-awaited tour of the Saguenay or Gaspésie! If you plan to use an online platform to rent a place to stay for a few days, here’s some info to help head off problems. 

Holiday accommodation rental keys for apartment

Can the place even be rented? 

Check with the person who is advertising the place as to whether they have the right to rent it.  

If they are tenants, rather than owners, renting to tourists may be considered a sub-lease or a commercial lease. Both of these require the landlord’s agreement.  

Even if the person owns the unit, they may not be allowed to rent it. Some condo association by-laws prohibit short-term rentals of condos.  

You may find yourself out on the street if the person advertising the place does not have the right to rent it! 

Is the place as good as it looks?  

A place can look great in online photos. But you may wish to look at the comments section to see if it’s really as good as it appears online. 

Also, the person renting the place must ensure that it’s in proper condition when you arrive so that you can enjoy it as you would expect to. 

You can ask for compensation if the place does not match how it was presented online or if it’s in poor condition when you arrive. You can first try to reach an agreement with the person. If that doesn’t work, you could even take them to court. 

Make yourself at home (and act accordingly) 

You have to behave as if you were at home. That is, do not disturb your neighbours or in any way prevent them from enjoying their units. 

When you leave, you must ensure the place is in the same condition as when you arrived. If you cause any damage to the unit during your stay, you could be held responsible.